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Neurology in the News
 

Neurology in the News: 2008-2009 Archive (From Media Reports)


Dec. 28, 2009:
 
Alzheimer's Disease Research
 
Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, professor of neurology and director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, was quoted in the Dec. 28 Los Angeles Times about how accurately a TV drama depicted depression and memory loss.

"NCIS Drama is Nice Holiday Story, but Bad Medicine"


Dec. 25, 2009:
 
The Department of Neurology's Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI), was cited in a Dec. 25 New York Times review of a new PBS show hosted by Alan Alda called "The Human Spark." One of the upcoming episodes will feature Alda undergoing a brain scan at LONI.

"Fine Line between Humans and Other Beasts"


Dec. 24, 2009:
 
Dr. Jeffrey Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, commented Dec. 23 in the San Gabriel Valley Tribune about the county's new stroke center network and the importance of early treatment. The article also appeared Dec. 23 in the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin and Redlands Daily Facts and Dec. 24 in the Sun.

"Stroke Center Networks Shorten Response Times, Help to Save Brain Cells"


Dec. 21, 2009:
 
Psychology Today Touts Medical Benefit of Curry Spice
 
Dr. Shirah Vollmer, associate clinical professor of family medicine and psychiatry at the Semel Institute, wrote a Dec. 21 blog for Psychology Today.com. She discussed the role of curry spice curcumin (turmeric) in the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Vollmer cited research by Dr. Jeffrey Cummings and Greg Cole, professors of neurology.

"Have Yourself a Merry Little Curry"


Dec. 15, 2009:
 
KABC, Bloomberg Explore New Alzheimer's Theory
 
Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, professor of neurology and director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, appeared in a Dec. 15 KABC-Channel 7 story about a study suggesting that people with low levels of a hormone called leptin may have a four-times higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Cummings was also quoted in a Dec. 15 Bloomberg news article.

"Fat Hormone May Protect Against Alzheimer's"

"Low Hormone Level May Increase Alzheimer's Risk, Study Finds"


Dec. 15, 2009:
 
Alzheimer's Disease Research
 
Dr. John Ringman, associate professor of neurology and assistant director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, was quoted Dec.15 by Medscape about the role the hormone leptin may play in Alzheimer's. In a separate story, he commented about the results of a clinical trial that showed that the drug tarenflurbil had no effect on cognition or activities of daily living in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease.

"High Leptin Levels May Protect Against Dementia"

"No Effect of Tarenflurbil on Cognition, Activities of Daily Living, in Early Alzheimer's Disease"


Dec. 14, 2009:
 
New device to control sleep apnea
 
Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology and associate director of the Sleep Disorders Program, was quoted Dec. 14 on the Technology Review website about a new device to control sleep apnea.

"A Stimulating Treatment for Sleep Apnea"


Dec. 11, 2009:
 
HealthDay Finds Not All Stroke Patients Continue Medications
 
Dr. Eric Cheng, assistant professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, finding that 20 percent of stroke survivors fail to continue taking their medications. The story appeared in U.S. News and World Report, Forbes and Yahoo News, among others.

"Many Stroke Survivors Don't Take Lifesaving Meds"


Dec. 8, 2009:
 
News Outlets Report on Findings that Some Stroke Patients Skip Medications
 
United Press International on Dec. 7 and LA Opinion and El Diario/La Prensa (NY) on Dec. 8 reported on a study that looked at whether the use of antithrombotic medications among stroke survivors increased over a seven-year period. The results found that in each of the years, approximately 20 percent of survivors were not taking these medications, and that individuals who were younger, female or Hispanic were less likely to be taking their medicine. Lead author Dr. Eric Cheng, assistant professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, was quoted.

"Some Don't Take Medication after Stroke"

"'Más Hispanos Repiten Infartos"


Dec. 3, 2009:
 
Media Explores Why We Talk and Chimps Don't
 
Advance for Speech Pathologists & Audiologists reported Dec. 3 on a Nature study led by Dr. Daniel Geschwind, Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Distinguished Chair in Human Genetics, that links the capacity for speech and language in humans to the evolution of a single gene. Geschwind and first author Gena Konopka, a postdoctoral fellow in neurology, were quoted. The findings were also covered Nov. 17 by Psychology Today and United Press International, Nov. 13 by BBC News and Xinhua (China), and Nov. 12 by The (London) Telegraph, Irish Times and Aberdeen (Scotland) Press and Journal.

"Human Capacity for Language"

"'Language Gene' Effects Explored"

"Why We Talk and Chimps Don't"

"Gene that 'Switches on' Ability to Speak found by Scientists"


Dec. 3, 2009:
 
Dr. Latisha Ali, director of the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center TeleStroke Network Program, and Virginia McFerran, chief information officer of the UCLA Health System, commented in the December issue of Healthcare Informatics about the rising use of high-tech telestroke programs that enable neurologists to optimize care for stroke patients.

"When Every Second Counts"


Nov. 24, 2009:
 
Dr. Paul Vespa, professor of neurosurgery, neurology and director of the neurocritical care unit at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, was quoted in a Nov. 24 ABC News article about a paralyzed Belgian man who spent the past 23 years in the hospital. Vespa was also interviewed for a CNN radio segment.

"Paralyzed Man was Awake for 23 Years, Not in Vegetative State"


Nov. 20, 2009:
 
Local News Spotlights New Network of Stroke Hospitals in L.A. County
 
The Los Angeles Times on Nov. 17, KNBC-Channel 4 on Nov. 16, Westside Today, Pasadena Star News, Daily Breeze and Whittier Daily News on Nov. 14, and the Glendale News Press on Nov. 11, reported on the launch of a new stroke-certified hospital system that has the potential to greatly improve response times, treatments and overall outcomes for those who suffer a stroke in Los Angeles County. The system works by directing select 9-1-1 stroke patients to a primary stroke center (including UCLA), rather than to the nearest hospital, in order to optimize care and minimize disability or death. Dr. Jeffery Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center was quoted. In addition, Dr. Latisha Ali, assistant clinical professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Telestroke program, was interviewed live on KNBC-Channel 4's morning news.

"LA County Paramedics Start Using Stroke Centers"

"KNBC Channel 4"

"Los Angeles County to Implement Stroke Center Hospital Network"

"Area Hospitals Join New Stroke Network"


Nov. 13, 2009:
 
Multiple Media Report on Why Can't Chimps Talk
 
A Nature study by Dr. Daniel Geschwind, professor of neurology and human genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute, uncovering how the evolution of a single gene may explain why humans can speak and chimpanzees cannot, was covered Nov. 11 by the New York Times, Science, New Scientist, Nature, USA Today, Associated Press, Reuters, the Times of London, the Daily Telegraph (U.K.), Science News, CanWest News Service (Canada), Wired, Agence France Press, El Mundo (Spain), ABC News Espanol, Live Science and others. Geschwind was quoted.

"Speech Gene Shows Its Bossy Nature"

"What's Behind Our Gift of Gab?"

"Evolution of a Single Gene Linked to Language"

"Gene Found that Seems Key in Evolution of Speech"


Nov. 6, 2009:
 
HealthLeaders Showcase Telemedicine for Faster Stroke Care
 
An Oct. 30 HealthLeaders Media article addressed the rising use of telemedicine to connect community hospitals with UCLA stroke experts to expedite patient treatment. Dr. Latisha Ali, director of the UCLA Telestroke Program at the UCLA StrokeCenter, was quoted.

"Telestroke Programs Link Stroke Specialists to Patients Unable to Access Care"


Nov. 5, 2009:
 
WSJ Covers Stimulus Funds that May Trigger Research Renaissance
 
An article in the Nov. 5 Wall Street Journal about the $10 billion in federal stimulus funds allocated for health research references UCLA's receipt of more than $67 million in National Institutes of Health grants for a variety of research projects, including studies on cancer, HIV/AIDS, Alzheimer's disease and other disorders. Marcia Smith, UCLA associate vice chancellor for research administration, and Dr. Arthur Toga, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, were quoted.

"Medical Research Spurt Offers Promise of New Cures"

"Stimulus grants spur new work into many treatments, cures"


Nov. 3, 2009:
 
UCLA neurologist wins major grant to study use of stem cells in treating stroke
 
Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael, associate professor in the Department of Neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and Dr. Gary Steinberg, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosurgery of Stanford University School of Medicine, have received a $20 million grant to investigate how stem cell research can help stroke victims.

"Read the article"


Oct. 30, 2009:
 
Media Reports on Study that Finds Heart Attack Risks Rising for Women
 
The Wall Street Journal Blog on Oct. 26, IT Wire on Oct. 28, and multiple news affiliates nationwide on Oct. 27, including KCAL-Channel 9, WFXT-Channel 25 (Boston) and WVUE-Channel 8 (New Orleans), reported on a USC/UCLA study that found the risk of heart attack for women ages 35 - 54 is rising, while it has fallen for men in the same age group. Study co-author, Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, associate professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and director of the Olive View-UCLA stroke program, was cited in the IT Wire article.

"Note to Middle-Aged Women: Your Heart-Attack Risk is Rising"

"Smaller Difference Seen Between Midlife Male, Female Heart Attacks"

"Heart Attack Study: Broadcast Coverage"


Oct. 15, 2009:
 
NBC Affiliates Explore Obesity's Link to Smaller Brains
 
Dr. Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was featured in an Oct.15 news segment that ran on 60 NBC affiliates about his brain imaging research that found that parts of the brain involved in memory and planning are, on average, smaller in overweight and obese people.

"Obesity Linked to Alzheimer's"


Oct. 8, 2009:
 
HealthDay Reports on Need for Stroke Prevention
 
HealthDay News on Oct. 2 and Medical News Today on Oct. 5 reported on a Lancet Neurology study co-authored by Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, associate professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and director of the Olive View-UCLA stroke program. The research looked at the need for routine stroke-prevention therapies in the elderly. HealthDay's report also appeared in Modern Medicine on Oct. 8.

"More Elderly Might Benefit From Stroke Treatment"

"Very Elderly Age Group: Need for Routine Stroke Prevention Therapies and Research in Epilepsy"


Oct. 2, 2009:
 
Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, associate professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and director of the Olive View-UCLA stroke program, was interviewed in the October issue of ACP Internists about how stroke physicians can collaborate with primary care physicians to maintain patient care following a stroke.

"Collaboration Key to Post-Stroke Follow Up"


Sept. 30, 2009:
 
Forbes Recounts Road to Approval for Infantile Spasm Drug
 
Forbes reported Sept. 30 on the efforts of Dr. Donald Shields, professor of pediatric neurology, to win Food and Drug Administration approval for a drug to treat infantile spasms, a rare and sometimes fatal form of epilepsy. He was quoted.

"A Long and Deadly Wait"


Sept. 30, 2009:
 
Dr. Gregory Cole, professor of neurology at the Semel Institute and associate director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, was quoted in a Sept. 30 HealthDay News article about concussions and their possible link to dementia. The article also ran online at Yahoo News, U.S. News & World Report and Forbes. He was also quoted Sept. 20 by the Newport News (VI) Daily Press about the potential for Alzheimer's prevention by controlling inflammation with omega-3 fatty acids and curcumin.

"Dementia Risk Higher for NFL Players"

"Using Food to Battle Inflammation"


Sept. 24, 2009:
 
CBS' "The Doctors" Examines Parkinson's Disease
 
Dr. Jeff Bronstein, professor of neurology and director of the Movement Disorder Program, appeared in a Sept. 24 segment of CBS' "The Doctors", discussing the genetic and environmental factors that can lead to Parkinson's disease.

"Is It in Your Genes?"


Sept. 21, 2009:
 
Dana Foundation Examines Obesity's Link to Smaller Brains
 
Dr. Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was featured in a Sept. 21 article on the Dana Foundation's Brain Works website. His brain imaging studies found that the brain regions involved in memory and planning are smaller in overweight and obese people.

"Obesity May Increase Alzheimer's Risk"


Sept. 21, 2009:
 
KCBS Notes Rising Numbers of Alzheimer's Cases
 
Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, professor of neurology and director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, appeared Sept. 21 in KCBS-Channel 2 and KCAL-Channel 9 segments about the latest advances in Alzheimer's research and new drugs that available to slow symptoms.

"Alzheimer's Disease/Jeffrey Cummings, M.D."


Sept. 21, 2009:
 
Dr. Gregory Cole, professor of neurology at the Semel Institute and associate director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, commented Sept. 21 in a HealthDay News article that appeared on the websites for KKFX-Channel 11 (Santa Barbara), WSBTV-Channel 2 (Atlanta), U.S. News & World Report and Yahoo News about the rising numbers of people diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. He also was quoted Sept. 17 by HealthDay News about the need to identify people with early Alzheimer's disease in order to test preventive methods. The story appeared on the websites for U.S. News & World Report, Yahoo News, KMPH-Channel 26 (Fresno), KCBA-Channel 35 (Monterey) and the Springfield News-Sun (OH).

"myfox11.com - Alzheimer's Soars, Global Focus Needed: Study"

"health.usnews.com - Alzheimer's Soars, Global Focus Needed: Study"

"Trouble with Daily Activities could Point to Alzheimer's Risk"


Sept. 21, 2009:
 
Dr. Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was quoted Sept. 21 on U.S. News & World Report.com about the steps people can take to help prevent Alzheimer's.

"Alzheimer's Disease is Sharply Rising, but You Can Lower Your Odds"


Sept. 15, 2009:
 
NBC Affiliate, Trades Feature Brain Cancer Research
 
The NBC affiliate WMTV-15 (WI) aired a story Sept. 11 highlighting research by Dr. Timothy Cloughesythat shows Avastin alone and in combination with chemotherapy improves response rates and survival times in patients with recurrent glioblastomas. Trade publications Drug Week and Biotech Business Week also cited the research Sept. 15. He is a professor of neurology and director of the Neuro-Oncology Program at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.


Sept. 14, 2009:
 
Dr. Christopher DeGiorgio, professor of neurology, was quoted in the Sept. 14 Wall Street Journal about his experimental use of omega 3s, a family of unsaturated fatty acids, to help stabilize the heart and reduce cases of sudden death among epileptics.

"Probing Health Benefits From Eating Omega 3s"


Sept. 10, 2009:
 
Brain Cancer Study Garners Widespread Attention
 
United Press International and Westside Today published stories Sept. 7 highlighting research by Dr. Timothy Cloughesy, director of the Neuro-Oncology Program at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and a professor of neurology, that shows Avastin alone and in combination with chemotherapy improves response rates and survival times in patients with recurrent glioblastomas. MedPageToday and HemOnc Today published stories on Sept. 4 and MedScape, Drug Week and Biotech Business Week featured the research on Sept. 10. The UPI story also appeared in the Ethiopian Review, RedOrbit.com and the Internet Times. The study appeared in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"Drug Improves Brain Cancer Survival"

"Breakthrough Cited for Recurrent Glioblastoma"

"Bevacizumab With, Without Irinotecan Improved Response, Survival in Recurrent Glioblastoma"

"Bevacizumab Brings Optimism to Recurrent Glioblastoma"


Sept. 8, 2009:
 
Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, commented Sept. 8 on the Science Now website about a paper that reported scientists have pinpointed a small spot in the brain that has a 71 percent chance of predicting whether high-risk patients will develop schizophrenia.

"Brain Scans for Schizophrenia?"


Sept. 7, 2009:
 
Dr. Gregory Cole, professor of neurology and associate director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, was quoted in a Sept. 7 HealthDay News article about a study that found that even a minor infection can double the rate of memory loss in people with Alzheimer's. The article ran in U.S News & World Report, YahooNews.com, KFRE-TV (Fresno, Calif.), and the Springfield (Ohio) News Sun.

"Even Mild Infections Hasten Decline with Alzheimer's - KMPH.com"

"Even Mild Infections Hasten Decline with Alzheimer's - YahooNews.com"


Sept. 6, 2009:
 
Telethon Highlights Duchenne Research
 
Dr. Melissa Spencer, an associate professor of neurology and co-director of the Center for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, was featured in a segment of the Muscular Dystrophy Association Telethon Sept. 6 on WXIN-TV (Indianapolis, Ind.) and KTVK-TV (Phoenix).


Sept. 6, 2009:
 
Media Continues Weighing Obesity and Smaller Brains
 
Dr. Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, continues to be featured in numerous media outlets about his brain imaging research that found that parts of the brain involved in memory and planning are, on average, smaller in overweight and obese people. These included the Sept. 3 Santa Monica Daily Press, Sept. 4 in news segments on WCTV-TV (Tallahasee, Fla.) and WBRC-TV (Birmingham, Ala.), and Sept. 6 on WBAK-TV (Bakersfield, Calif.).


Sept. 3, 2009:
 
Dr. Susan L. Perlman, clinical professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Ataxia Center and HD Center for Excellence, was quoted in a Sept. 3 Neurology Today article about a significant research paper that described the spectrum of Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

"Variant Ataxia-Telangiectasia Can Elude Diagnosis for Years"


Sept. 02, 2009:
 
Dr. Jeffrey Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, was cited in a Premium Health News Service wire story that described new guidelines for stroke intervention from the American Stroke Association. The article appeared Sept. 2 in the Hartford Courant (CT), Allentown Morning Call (PA) and KFSM-Channel 5 (AR).

"News Briefs: Extending the Time for Stroke Treatment"


August 31, 2009:
 
Florida Paper Looks at Obesity and Brain Size
 
An Aug. 31 editorial in the Pensacola News Journal (FL) highlighted research by Dr. Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, showing that brain regions involved in memory and planning are smaller in overweight and obese elderly people. Yahoo News reported on the research Aug. 28.

"Editorial: Exercise is Good for Body and Mind"

"Trends & Innovations - Friday"


August 26, 2009:
 
Obesity's Link to Smaller Brains Draws Headlines
 
Research by Dr. Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, finding that regions of the brain involved in memory and planning are smaller in overweight and obese people was covered Aug. 21 by the Daily Mail (U.K.); Aug. 23 by New Scientist; Aug. 25 by the Los Angeles Times health blog, Daily Breeze, HealthDay News, New York Daily News, KGO AM 810 (San Francisco), and KPBS 89.5 FM (San Diego); Aug. 26 by USA Today; Aug. 26 by Der Spiegel (Germany), as well as multiple Fox TV affiliates and European news outlets. The HealthDay report appeared on the websites for U.S. News & World Report, MSN and Yahoo News.

"Expanding Waistlines may Cause Shrinking Brains"

"Extreme Obesity Can Shorten People's Lives by 12 years"

"Obesity Linked to Brain Shrinkage, Erectile Dysfunction"

"Obesity can be a Drain on the Brain"


August 24, 2009:
 
Dr. David Liebeskind, associate neurology director of the UCLA Stroke Center, commented Aug. 24 in the Los Angeles Times about the medical accuracy of a stroke treatment portrayed on a recent TV show.

"The Unreal World: 'Hawthorne': Treatment Depends on When the Stroke Started"


August 23, 2009:
 
ABC's "Good Morning America" Showcases Robotic Doctoring
 
Dr. Paul Vespa, professor of neurosurgery and neurology, and director of the Neurocritical Care Program, appeared Aug. 23 on ABC's "Good Morning America Weekend" explaining how a robot in the neurosurgery intensive care unit can help doctors treat patients.

"Getting Treated by a Robot"


August 22, 2009:
 
L.A. Times Reports Doctor's Role in Developing Seizure Drug
 
The Los Angeles Times health blog reported Aug. 22 on Dr. W. Donald Shields, professor of pediatric neurology at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, who helped pioneer studies of an infantile spasms drug newly approved by the Federal Drug Administration. The drug's FDA approval was also covered by Modern Medicine on Aug. 26 and Quote.com on Aug. 21. Shields was quoted.

"FDA Approves First Drug for Infantile Spasms"

"FDA Gives OK to Drugs for Seizures, Allergies"

"Lundbeck Gets FDA Approval to Market Epilepsy Drug Sabril ? Update"


August 19, 2009:
 
New Scientist, London Mail Reports on Obesity and the Brain
 
Dr. Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was featured in the Aug. 19 London Mail and New Scientist Magazine about his research showing that regions in the brain that are key to cognition are smaller in obese, older people when compared with their leaner peers, making their brains look up to 16 years older than their true age.

"Obese People Have Smaller Brains than Their Skinny Counterparts"

"Expanding Waistlines May Cause Shrinking Brains"


August 17, 2009:
 
Dr. Gregory Cole, professor of medicine and neurology and associate director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, commented Aug. 17 in the Los Angeles Times about inflammation in the brain and its possible role in Alzheimer's disease. Segments also appeared Aug. 17 on KKFK Ch. 11 (Santa Barbara), and Aug. 18 on KMPH Ch. 11 (Fresno).

"Inflammation and How it Relates to Chronic Diseases"

"Mediterranean Diet plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk"


August 17, 2009:
 
Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, professor of neurology and director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, was quoted Aug. 17 in the Los Angeles Times about the relationship between high cholesterol and Alzheimer's risk, and habits people can adopt to help prevent the disease.

"Healthy Habits to Help Prevent Alzheimer's"


August 15, 2009:
 
Westside Today Spotlights Neuro Imaging Grant
 
Westside Today reported Aug. 15 that UCLA's Laboratory of Neuro Imaging received $1.9 million in federal Recovery Act funds to further its research on brain structure and function. Lab director Dr. Arthur Toga, professor of neurology and associate director of the Division of Brain Mapping, was quoted.

"UCLA Gets Stimulated"


August 15, 2009:
 
Neurologist Addresses New Play on Autism
 
Examiner.com reported Aug. 15 on a new play airing on KPCC 89.3FM's "LA Theatre Works" about an autistic teen. The broadcast featured an interview with neurologist Dr. Daniel Geschwind, professor of neurology and psychiatry and director of the UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment.

"Free Theater: LA Theatre Works Airs 'Lucy'"


August 12, 2009:
 
Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology and associate director of the sleep disorder clinic, appeared Aug. 12 on KPCC 89.3 FM's Patt Morrison show. He discussed the increasing number of Americans turning to sleeping pills to get a night's rest.

"Why is it So Hard to Get a Good Night's Sleep?"


August 12, 2009:
 
Dr. David Teplow, professor of neurology, was featured in the August 12 Hindustan Times about his study in which he reconstructed amyloid-beta brain clusters associated with Alzheimer's in the laboratory and determined their levels of toxicity.

"Hindustan Times Reports on New Target for Alzheimer's Treatment"


August 11, 2009:
 
Dr. Gregory Cole, professor of medicine and neurology and associate director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer Disease Research, commented Aug. 11 in HealthDay News about the benefits of diet and exercise to prevent Alzheimer's. The article also appeared on the websites for US News & World Report, Yahoo, MSN and the Springfield News-Sun (OH).

"Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk"


August 05, 2009:
 
A UCLA study testing whether an experimental drug slows the progression of Alzheimer's disease was featured in an Aug. 5 story on KCAL-Channel 9 and KCBS-Channel 2. The segment focused on a woman enrolled in the UCLA study site and included an interview with Dr. Joshua Grill, director of the education and recruitment core for the Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research at UCLA.

"Doctors Work to Slow Progression of Alzheimer's"


August 05, 2009:
 
Research by Beate Ritz, professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health, and Dr. Jeff Bronstein, professor of neurology, was featured in a July 5 Los Angeles Times article about their finding that rural residents who drink from private wells are up to twice as likely to develop Parkinson's disease caused by pesticides in the water.

"Pesticides in Well Water Linked to Parkinson's Disease"


July 31, 2009:
 
Dr. Bruce Dobkin, professor of neurology, was quoted June 23 by BBC News about overseas "stem cell tourism? in which people hope to find a cure for spinal injuries using stem cells.

"Stem Cell Tourism in Germany"


July 17, 2009:
 
Dr. Joshua Grill, director of education for the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer Disease, was quoted July 12 in The Signal newspaper about people who provide care to Alzheimer's patients.

"Taking Care of the Caregivers"


July 15, 2009:
 
Dr. Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging at the Semel Institute, commented July 15 in a New Scientist article about the contribution that genes make to intelligence.

"Intelligence: Nature outpaces nurture as kids get older"


July 10, 2009:
 
Dr. Arthur Toga, professor of neurology and director of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was quoted July 3 in Science about proposed salary cuts and furloughs for allUniversity of California faculty and staff.

"Proposal to Slash Salaries Riles California Researchers"


July 02, 2009:
 
Dr. Frisca Yan-Go, medical director of the sleep disorders center at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital, was quoted about sleep problems in the July edition of Reader's Digest.

"Seven Sleep Disorders: What's Keeping You Awake?"


June 15, 2009:
 
Research showing a possible link between depression and Alzheimer's disease by Po H. Lu, an assistant professor of neurology and a member of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, was featured June 15 in the London Times and HealthDay News and June 16 on the Ivanhoe News website, All Headline News, Medical News Today, the Times of India, HealthJockey.com, China's Xinhua News Service, and MedPage Today. U.S. News & World Report carried the HealthDay story.

"Depression 'Hastens Alzheimer's in Patients with Memory Problems'"

"Study Links Depression to Alzheimer's Disease"

"Drug May Stem Slide into Alzheimer's for Some"


June 11 , 2009
 
Dr. Andrew Charles, professor and director of the Headache Research and Treatment Program in the Department of Neurology, was featured in a June 11 segment of the Patt Morrison show on NPR affiliate KPCC- 89.3 FM. Charles discussed the latest research into controlling migraine headaches.

"A Brain Wider than the Sky: A Migraine Diary/Calling All Migraine-Sufferers"


June 10, 2009
 
Dr. Marc Nuwer, professor of clinical neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, commented June 10 in a Newsday story about a provision in a federal healthcare bill that would allow children to remain on their parents' insurance until age 26.

"Federal Health Insurance Plan Targets Young Adults"


June 8, 2009
 
USA Today Focuses on How Meditation Benefits Kids and Adults
An article in the June 8 edition of USA Today about the growing popularity of meditation highlighted brain-imaging research led by Eileen Luders, a postdoctoral research fellow at the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, suggesting that regular meditation may lead to a significant increase in the brain's gray matter. Luders was cited. The article also highlighted research by Susan Smalley, a UCLA professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and a member of the Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, on meditation's effect on schoolchildren. Smalley was quoted.

"'Mindfulness' Meditation Being Used in Hospitals and Schools"


June 5, 2009
 
Dr. John Mazziotta, chair of neurology, was cited in a June 2 Los Angeles Times story about a movie special-effects expert who created a "flight" through the brain. Mazziotta was a project consultant.

"Edward Norton's Brain, Up Close and Personal"


May 28, 2009:
 
New Stroke Guidelines Garner Wide Interest
The Associated Press, HealthDay News, Chicago Tribune and MedPage Today reported May 28 on new guidelines to expand the window of time that stroke patients can be treated with a clot-busting drug. Dr. Jeffrey Saver, director of the UCLA Stroke Center, and a member of the American Heart Association Stroke Council that wrote the guidelines, was quoted.

"Window for Stroke Treatment Opens Wider"

"Stroke Treatment Expanded to 4.5 Hours"

"Stroke Group Expands Time for Clot-Busting Drugs"

"Post-Stroke Thrombolysis Window Expanded to 4.5 Hours"


May 25, 2009:
 
UPI Scrutinizes Bigger Brains through Meditation
United Press International reported May 25 on brain-imaging research by Eileen Luders, a postdoctoral research fellow at the UCLA Lab of Neuro Imaging, that links regular meditation to a significant increase in the brain's gray matter.

"Meditation May Lead to a Bigger Brain"


April 10, 2009:
 
1. Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology and associate director of the sleep disorder clinic, commented on several ABC affiliates in a news segment about a device that supposedly eliminates the feeling of sluggishness when you first awake. The story appeared April 2 on KEZI-Channel 9 (OR), KAKE-Channel 10 (KS), and KOHD-Channel 19 (OR), and April 3 on KOCO-Channel 5 (OK) and WTOK-Channel 11 (MS).  Avidan was also quoted in an April 7 news story on ABC.com about treatments and causes of the neurological disorder Restless Leg Syndrome and its link to obesity.

"Do You Hate How You Feel First Thing in the Morning?"
http://kezi.com/page/104038

"Restless Leg Syndrome Linked to Obesity, Fat Waistlines"
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/MindMoodNews/story?id=7272011&page=1


April 3, 2009:

1. KCAL Addresses the Problem of Sleep Apnea
Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology and associate director of the UCLA Sleep Disorder Clinic, was featured in a March 30 news segment on KCAL-Channel 9 about sleep apnea. Avidan discussed the causes and solutions of the disorder, which is characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep.

"Snoring -- ZZZZzzz -- and Sleep Apnea a Problem?"
http://cbs2.com/health/Sleep.Apnea.Snoring.2.971856.html
 

2. Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology and associate director of the sleep disorder clinic, was quoted in a March 30 news segment on KABC-Channel 7 about a watch-like device that monitors your sleep patterns.

"Say Goodbye to Blurry Mornings"
http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/health&id=6736481


March 27, 2009:

1. NPR Studies Link between Brain's Wiring, Intelligence
National Public Radio aired a March 20 interview with Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, about his latest research.  He used a new type of brain-imaging scanner to show that intelligence is strongly influenced by the quality of the brain's axons, or wiring, that send signals in the brain. A City News Service story also appeared in the March 22 Los Angeles Daily News, and online reports appeared March 23 on KNBC-Channel 4 and KABC-Channel 7, and March 19 in the Hindustan Times.

"Smart People Really Do Think Faster"
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=102169531

"Bad at Math? Blame it on Your Parents"
http://www.nbclosangeles.com/health/tips_info/Bad-at-Math-Blame-It-on-Your-Parents.html
 

2. UPI Cites New Treatment for Epilepsy
The research of Christopher DeGiorgio, professor of neurology, was featured in a March 23 United Press International story.  He found that a unique nerve-stimulation device, or "brain pacemaker," reduced seizures in patients with intractable epilepsy by more than 50 percent.

"New Treatment for Epilepsy Found Effective"



March 20, 2009:

1. "Dateline" Spotlights Sleepwalking Behavior
Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology and associate director of the sleep disorder clinic, was featured March 13 in an NBC "Dateline" segment about the remarkable things people are capable of while sleepwalking.

"Deadly Dreams"
"http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032600/
 

2. Media Discuss Actress' Brain Injury
Media this week tapped UCLA brain injury experts to help explain trauma issues to the brain. Dr. Christopher Giza, associate professor of neurosurgery and pediatric neurology, was quoted in a March 17 Los Angeles Times story and featured in the nationally syndicated TV show "Inside Edition" (locally KCBA-Ch. 2) about the brain injury suffered by actress Natasha Richardson.  Dr. Neil Martin, chair of neurosurgery, was interviewed March 17 and March 18 on CNN's Larry King Show, and March 19 on a BBC broadcast regarding brain injury. Dr. Paul Vespa, associate professor of neurosurgery and neurology, and director of the Neuro Critical Care Unit, was quoted in a March 19 Reuters article about brain trauma.

"Natasha Richardson Suffers Serious Brain Injury"
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-richardson18-2009mar18,0,840650.story

"Natasha Richardson Seriously Injured"
http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0903/17/lkl.01.html

"Brain Expert on Fatal Head Injuries"
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7951983.stm

"Richardson's Death Shows Need to Protect Brain"
http://www.reuters.com/article/peopleNews/idUSTRE52I6VY20090319

"Natasha Richardson: "Talk and Die" Syndrome
http://www.insideedition.com/news.aspx?storyID=2743


March 13, 2009:

1. New Scientist Explores how Genes Impact IQ
Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was featured in a March 10 New Scientist article about his study that mapped, for the first time, how genes affect IQ and brain fiber integrity. Britain's Telegraph reported the news on March 12 and an article also appeared on the Channel4 (United Kingdom) website

"High Speed Brains are in the Genes"
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20126993.300-highspeed-brains-are-in-the-genes.html 

"Inherited Genes Play a Far Greater Role in Intelligence than was Previously Thought, New Research Suggests"
http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/society/health/intelligence+genes+theory+backed/3026007

"People with Thicker Heads 'Are More Intelligent'"
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/scienceandtechnology/science/4977342/People-with-thicker-heads-are-more-intelligent.html
 


2. Ventura Paper Highlights Clinical Trial Drug
The Ventura County Star on March 2 profiled a UCLA patient who experienced a successful outcome in a clinical trial with a drug to treat infantile spasms.  The girl's physician, Dr. Donald Shields, professor of pediatric neurology at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, was quoted. "Drug that Helped Newbury Park Girl with Spasms Nears FDA Approval"


3. Jeff Bronstein, professor of neurology and director of the Movement Disorders Program, was quoted in a March 9 Los Angeles Times article about a Food and Drug Administration ruling that manufacturers of a drug used in the treatment of diabetes and gastroesophageal reflux must include a warning about the potential for a certain neurological disorder.

"Gastrointestinal Drug gets 'Black Box' Warning"


March 6, 2009:
 
1. Brain Cancer Research Cited by Trade
Research by Dr. Tim Cloughesy, director of the neuro-oncology program at UCLA and a researcher at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, on the drug Avastin for glioblastoma was featured March 5 in Ad Hoc News.

"Avastin Shows Encouraging Results in Patients with the Most Aggressive Form of Brain Cancer"

 

2. Dr. Donald Shields, UCLA professor of pediatric neurology was quoted in a March 2 Ventura County Star article about anticipated Food and Drug Administration approval of a drug to treat infantile spasms.

"Drug that helped Newbury Park Girl with Spasms Nears FDA Approval"
http://www.venturacountystar.com/news/2009/mar/02/drug-that-helped-newbury-park-girl-with-spasms/

 

February 20, 2009:

1. Stroke's "Golden Hour" Draws Headlines
HealthDay News, NBC News Channel, MedPage Today and Doctor's Guide News were among outlets reporting Feb. 18 on a new study showing that patients who reached the hospital within the "golden" first hour after suffering a stroke were more likely to receive the clot-busting drug called tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Lead author Dr. Jeffrey Saver, director of the UCLA Stroke Center, was quoted.

"Fast Arrival at Hospital after Stroke Pays Off"
http://health.usnews.com/articles/health/healthday/2009/02/18/fast-arrival-at-hospital-after-stroke-pays-off.html

"The First Hour Critical to Stroke Victims"
http://www.14wfie.com/Global/story.asp?S=9866301&nav=3w6r

"ASA: Arrival within Golden Hour Improves Likelihood of Getting tPA"
http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ASA/12957

"Stroke Patients Who Reach Hospitals within "Golden Hour" Twice as Likely to Get Clot-busting Drug"
http://www.docguide.com/news/content.nsf/news/852571020057CCF685257561006EFBEF

"Recognizing Signs of a Stroke"
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=news/health&id=6665552&rss=rss-wabc-article-6665552
 

2. Media Highlights Studies that Examine Benefits of Tea and Coffee in Preventing Stroke
HealthDay, WebMD, MedPageToday, MSNBC and the NBC News Channel reported Feb. 19, and the New York Daily News reported Feb. 20, on two separate UCLA studies that examined the health benefits of drinking tea or coffee in reducing the risk of stroke.  Lenore Arab, professor of biological chemistry, general internal medicine and health services research, found that three cups a day of green or black tea can reduce stroke risk by 21 percent.  Dr. David Liebeskind, associate neurology director at the UCLA Stroke Center, found that symptoms of transient ischemic attack or stroke are "far less common" in people reporting intake of more than six cups of coffee per day.  Both researchers presented their findings at the American Heart Association's international stroke conference and Arab's study was published in the journal Stroke.

"Tea, Coffee May Reduce Stroke Risk"
http://www.webmd.com/stroke/news/20090219/tea-coffee-may-reduce-stroke-risk?src=RSS_PUBLIC

"Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk"
http://www.forbes.com/feeds/hscout/2009/02/20/hscout624289.html

 "Coffee May Lower Stroke Risk"
http://www.14wfie.com/Global/story.asp?S=9873523&nav=menu54_5

"ASA: Daily Cups of Tea Could Help Prevent Stroke"
http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ASA/12964

"Tea May Thwart Strokes, Sez Prof"
http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/health/2009/02/19/2009-02-19_tea_may_thwart_strokes_sez_prof.html

"Lowering Your Risk for Stroke"
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29288266/

 
3. HealthDay Highlights Benefits of Taking Vitamins in Preventing Stroke
HealthDay on Feb. 19 reported on a new UCLA stroke study that found taking recommended doses of B-complex vitamins to reduce levels of homocysteine, an amino acid that increases artery disease risk, may lower ischemic stroke patients' risk of recurring stroke and other future vascular events.  The study was presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference.  Lead author, Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, associate professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and director of the Olive View?UCLA stroke program, was cited. 

"Good Adherence to Therapy May Benefit Stroke Patients"

 

February 13, 2009:

1. An obituary of Dr. John Menkes, who established the pediatric neurology program at UCLA in 1966, was published in the February edition of the American Academy of Pediatrics News.

"In Memoriam: Dr. Menkes was Expert on Inherited Metabolic Diseases"
http://aapnews.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/30/2/25
 
Dr. Tim Cloughesy, director of the neuro-oncology program at UCLA and a researcher at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, was quoted Feb. 8 about a brain-cancer survivor treated at UCLA who created an organization that helps raise money for UCLA's neuro-oncology program.

"Brain Cancer Survivors' Art Gives them More to Live for"
http://www.dailynews.com/ci_11655197

 
January 30, 2009:
 
1. An obituary of Dr. John Menkes, who established the pediatric neurology program at UCLA in 1966, was published in the Jan. 2 edition of Neurology Today.

"Distinguished Pediatric Neurologist John H. Menkes, MD, Dies at 79"

 
2. The research of David Teplow, professor of neurology, was cited in a Jan. 23 Newsweek.com article about his research showing that naturally occurring compounds in red wine can inhibit the development of proteins that deposit in the brain and form the plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

"Four More Reasons to Drink Red Wine"
http://www.newsweek.com/id/181242


January 23, 2009:
 
1. Dr. Daniel Geschwind, MacDonald Professor of Human Genetics and professor of neurology, psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences, commented Jan. 21 in an MSNBC.com article exploring the predominance of presidents who are left-handed, including President Obama. 

"White House Leans Again to the Left(ies)"
http://bodyodd.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2009/01/21/1755994.aspx
 

2. Dr. Malcolm Taw, assistant clinical professor at the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, and Dr. Yoon-Hee Cha, a visiting assistant professor of neurology at the Semel Institute, commented Jan. 21 in a Los Angeles Times article about treating and preventing seasickness.

"Remedies to Keep Seasickness at Bay"
http://travel.latimes.com/articles/la-trw-seasick25-2009jan25
 

3. Arthur Toga, professor of neurology and director of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging at the Semel Institute, was quoted in the Jan. 17 New York Times about scientists who use their children as research subjects. Toga has used magnetic resonance imaging to map the brain development of his three children.

"Test Subjects Who Call the Scientist Mom or Dad"
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/18/science/18kids.html?_r=2&partner=MOREOVERNEWS&ei=5040

 



January 16, 2009:

1. Extra! Discusses Epilepsy and Death of Actor's Son
Dr. John Stern, associate professor of neurology and co-director of the Seizure Disorder Center in the Semel Institute, appeared in a Jan. 6 segment on NBC's Extra! about epilepsy and the death of actor John Travolta's son.

"Jett Travolta Mourned"
http://extratv.warnerbros.com/2009/01/jett_travolta_mourned.php?page=5



January 2, 2009:

1. Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, associate professor of neurology and director of the Olive View/UCLA Stroke Program, was quoted in a Dec. 22 Alternet.com article about identifying the warning signs of strokes.
 

"Want to Save Some Lives? Here is a Simple Formula for Identifying Strokes"

 


December 12, 2008:
 
1. UPI Reports U.S. Healthcare System "Too American"
United Press International reported Dec. 5 and the Imperial Valley News reported Dec. 6 on two articles published in the journal Neurology by Dr. Marc Nuwer, professor of clinical neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine, on the challenges facing U.S. healthcare reform.
 
"Expert: American Values Harm Healthcare"

"American Values Blamed for Health Care Crisis"

 

 
December 5, 2008:

1. Channel 2 Talks Zzzzs with Sleep Expert
Dr. Frisca Yan-Go, director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center in Santa Monica, commented Nov. 26 in a KCBS-Channel 2 report about a sleep-tracking watch that its makers claim can determine the optimal time to wake people from sleep.
http://cbs2.com/video/?id=84566@kcbs.dayport.com


2. LA Times Recounts the Life of Physician Who Established UCLA's Pediatric Neurology Program
An obituary in the Los Angeles Times on Nov. 29 recapped the life of Dr. John H. Menkes, who founded the pediatric neurology program at UCLA in 1966.  Menkes was known as a "giant" in the field and was credited with identifying Menkes disease, maple syrup urine disease and other neural system disorders.  Dr. Raman Sankar, chief of pediatric neurology at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, commented. 

"John H. Menkes Dies at 79; Doctor Established UCLA's Pediatric Neurology Program"
http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-me-menkes29-2008nov29,0,7736712.story

 
3. Dr. Jerome Engel, professor of neurology and director of the Seizure Disorder Center, was quoted in Dec. 2 in Bloomberg News and HealthDay News articles about a study assessing the benefits of surgery for people with temporal lobe epilepsy.

"Brain Surgery for Epilepsy Extends Life Expectancy, Study Says"
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601124&sid=auSTqAMtikdI&refer=science

"Surgery a Boon for Most Common Form of Epilepsy"
http://health.discovery.com/news/healthscout/article.html?article=621887&category=18&year=2008

 
4. Dr. Barbara Giesser, professor and vice chair of neurology, was quoted in a Dec. 1 Los Angeles Times's article about the accuracy of a recent television show's portrayal of adolescent multiple sclerosis.

"'Eli Stone' Wrongly Paints Pot as Potential Cure for Multiple Sclerosis"
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-unreal1-2008dec01,0,5721240.column?track=rss

 


November 28, 2008:

1 Asian Wires Investigate How Wine Helps Thwart Alzheimer's
China's Xinhua News Service on Nov. 24 and Asian News International on Nov. 22 reported on a study by researchers at UCLA and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York that found that polyphenols ?compounds occurring naturally in red wine ? can block changes in the brain that lead to Alzheimer's disease. David Teplow, professor of neurology, was quoted.

"U.S. Researchers Isolate Beneficial Wine Element"

"How Red Wine Fights Alzheimer's Disease"

 


November 21, 2008:

1. KCBS, UPI Spotlight Red Wine's Protection against Alzheimer's
KCBS-Channel 2 featured Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, professor of neurology and director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, in a Nov. 10 segment about research by David Teplow, professor of neurology.  Teplow discovered why compounds called polyphenols found in red wine may protect against Alzheimer's. The segment aired on 22 CBS affiliates nationwide.  United Press International also featured Teplow in a Nov. 19 story about his findings.
 
"Wine Can Benefit Alzheimer's Patients"

"Red Wine May Help Ward Off Alzheimer's"
 


2.  Pesticide-Parkinson's Link Reported by California Media
The Fresno Bee and Ventura County Star reported Nov. 18 on UCLA research linking Parkinson's disease to long-term exposure to agricultural pesticides, particularly among residents of the San Joaquin Valley.  The findings were also covered Nov. 17 by KFWB 890AM, Fox-affiliate KTVU (San Francisco), ABC-affiliate KERO (Bakersfield) and NBC-affiliate KGET (Bakersfield).   Dr. Jeff Bronstein, professor of neurology, and Beate Ritz, associate professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health, were quoted in the Bee.

"Local: Study Bolsters Link between Parkinson's, Pesticide"
http://www.fresnobee.com/263/story/1016795.html

 


November 7, 2008:

1.  Researchers ID Gene Linked to Speech Problems
Science magazine reported Nov. 5 on a study co-authored by Dr. Daniel Geschwind, the Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Professor of Human Genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and professor of neurology and psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, that identified a gene linked to common forms of speech and language disorders.

"First Genetic Clue to Common Speech Disorder"
http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2008/1105/4

 


October 31:

1. Dr. Yoon-Hee Cha, assistant professor of neurology in the Semel Institute, was quoted Oct. 27 in a New York Times article about the body's vestibular system, which contributes to balance.

"The Unappreciated, Holding Our Lives in Balance"
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/28/science/28angi.html

 
2. Dr. Dan Geschwind, professor of neurology and psychiatry, commented Oct. 23 in The Daily Mail (U.K.) and Oct. 24 in The Guardian (U.K.) about the high number of U.S. presidents who have been left-handed.  Both candidates in the current campaign are lefties.  

"Revealed: the Leftist Plot to Control the White House"

"As Two Lefties Vie for the American Presidency... Why Are So Many U.S. Premiers Left-handed?"

 

October 24:

1. ABC Helps Parents Get the Facts on Autism:
Dr. Dan Geschwind, professor of neurology and psychiatry, was interviewed by ABC News for an On Call story posted Oct. 23 about what parents should know about autism.
 
"ABC News: Can Things I Do (Or Not Do) As a Parent Cause Autism in My Child?"
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/AutismRisk/story?id=5386984
 

2. U.K. Outlet Reports Pesticides' Link to Parkinson's
Barchester Healthcare (U.K.) reported Oct. 22 on a new NIH study by Dr. Marie-Francoise Chesselet, chair of neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine, that examines the relationship between agricultural pesticides and Parkinson's disease.
 
"Study Examines Link between Pesticides and Parkinson's"

 


October 17:

1. Greg Cole, professor of neurology in the Semel Institute and associate director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center, was quoted Oct. 14 in HealthDay News about research suggesting that vitamin B supplements do not slow Alzheimer's progression in patients with mild to moderate forms of the disease.

"Vitamin B No Help for Alzheimer's"
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/14/AR2008101402050.html

 

September 26:

1. San Gabriel Paper Details Boy's Recovery from Brain Surgery
The San Gabriel Valley Tribune ran a Sept. 25 profile of a 4-year-old Azusa boy who underwent hemispherectomy brain surgery at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA to treat severe seizures.  Dr. Gary Mathern, director of the pediatric epilepsy surgery program and pediatric neurosurgery program, and Dr. Raman Sankar chief of pediatric neurology, were interviewed.

"4-Year-Old Azusa Boy in Recovery after Radical Brain Surgery"
http://www.sgvtribune.com/highlanders/ci_10557446

 
2. Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology and associate director of the sleep disorder clinic, was quoted Sept. 23 by KCBS-Channel 2 about the working hours of the Metrolink engineer involved in the recent crash.

"Exclusive: Metrolink Engineer: the Final Hours"
http://cbs2.com/video/?id=77982@kcbs.dayport.com.

 
3. Dr. Elyse Singer, professor of neurology and director of UCLA's National Neurological AIDS Bank, commented in a Sept. 18 story by the CBC (Canada) on the importance of brain donations to advance research on neurological disease.  UCLA patient and prospective donor Michael Sausser was quoted.

"Brain Banks: Crucial for Research, Clamoring for Donors"
http://www.cbc.ca/health/story/2008/09/18/f-brainbanks-troyer.html

 

September 19:

1. New York Times Shows How a Brain Develops
Paul Thompson, a professor of neurology and member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was featured in the Sept. 15 New York Times concerning his research into how a brain matures. Thompson's time-lapse images show that different areas of the brain mature at different rates, which helps explain many of the intellectual and emotional changes seen in children, teens and young adults. Thompson used MRI imaging taken repeatedly over years to record developmental milestones. The work was also reported in the September issue of Harvard Magazine.

"The Child's Developing Brain"
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/09/15/health/20080915-brain-development.html

"The Teen Brain"
http://harvardmagazine.com/2008/09/the-teen-brain.html


September 12:

1. Dr. Alon Avidan, medical director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Clinic, and Ronald Harper, professor of neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine, commented on the health benefits of sleep and the risks resulting from not sleeping enough in an article in the September/October edition of Singular magazine. 
"The Power of Sleep" 

2. Greg Cole, professor of neurology and associate director of the Alzheimer Disease Center; and Dr. Mary Hardy, medical director of the Simms-Mann/UCLA Center for Integrative Oncology at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, were quoted Sept. 8 in the Los Angeles Times about the possible health benefits of curcumin, a bright-yellow compound found in the spice turmeric.
"Curcumin's Anti-Inflammatory Powers Are Unproven"
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-skeptic8-2008sep08,0,7896646.story
 

 

September 5:

1. Discovery Channel Explores Medical Mystery
Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology and associate director of the sleep disorder clinic, was featured July 8 on the Discovery Channel program "Mystery ER."  It described the story of a young man with Kleine-Levin Syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by the need for excessive amounts of sleep.

"Mystery ER - Speedbump"
http://health.discovery.com/tv/mystery-er/episode-guide.html

 
2. National Geographic Studies Death
David Hovda, professor of neurosurgery, director of Brain Injury Research Center, Division of Neurosurgery; Dr. Paul Vespa, associate clinical professor of neurosurgery and director of the Neuro Critical Care Unit; and neurosurgery ICU nurses Jennifer Youngblood, Felicity Rensinger, and Debbie Ceasar were featured Sept. 2 on a National Geographic "Explorer" program that examined the process of death and the state of coma.

"Moment of Death"
http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/explorer/3815/Overview#tab-Overview

 
3. Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, professor of neurology and director of the Alzheimer Disease Center, was quoted Sept. 3 about a clinical trial that took place in Russia for a new Alzheimer's drug.

"Pfizer Gambles on Russian Alzheimer's Pill"

 


August 29, 2008:

1. NBC Looks at Southpaw Presidents
Dr. Daniel Geschwind, professor of neurology, psychiatry and genetics and director of the Center for Autism Research, was featured Aug. 26 on NBC Nightly News about the high incidence of left-handedness among recent U.S. presidents and presidential candidates.

"Next President will be a Southpaw"
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032619/#26408224

 

August 22, 2008:

1. A listing by The Chronicle of Philanthropy of recent gifts of $1-million or more made by individuals to charitable institutions has cited as its largest gift the $10-million donation by James L. Easton to the UCLA Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research. The money will be used to conduct research on Alzheimer's disease.

"America's Top Donors"
http://philanthropy.com/topdonors/gifts.php?view=donor&donor=PGDON5277&year=2008

 
2. Dr. John Ringman, associate professor of neurology and the assistant director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, was quoted August 15 in the MetroWest Daily News (Framingham, MA) on the possible benefits of the spice curcumin for Alzheimer's patients.
 
"One Woman's Battle with the Effects of Salmonella"
http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/x1507910686/One-womans-battle-with-the-effects-of-salmonella

 
3. Paul Thompson, a professor of neurology and member of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was quoted August 20 in an article on MSNBC.com about the use of the amphetamine Adderall to lose weight. The article also appears in the September issue of Allure Magazine.

"Speed Diet: Women using ADD drugs to get Thin"
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26076014/

 

August 15, 2008:

1. Reuters Explores Stroke Study
Reuters reported Aug. 12 on a UCLA study published in the August edition of the journal Stroke that linked elevated serum levels of calcium within a few days after ischemic stroke with improved function months later. Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, associate professor of neurology and director of the Olive-View/UCLA Stroke Center, was cited. He also commented in the Aug. 14 online edition of Ebony Jet magazine about strokes in black children with sickle cell disease.

"Delayed Determination of Serum Calcium Predicts Stroke Outcome"

"Pediatric Strokes"

 
2. KPCC Describes Latest Alzheimer's Advances
Dr. John Ringman, associate professor of neurology and assistant director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, was a featured guest Aug. 13 on KPCC's 89.3 FM "AirTalk" show. He discussed the latest research and treatment concerning Alzheimer's disease.

"The Latest on Alzheimer's Disease"
http://www.scpr.org/programs/airtalk/

 
3. Sally Frautschy, associate professor of neurology, was quoted Aug. 8 in the Evening Sun (PA) about the possible benefits of curcumin to ward off Alzheimer's disease.

"Wellness in a Minute: Benefits of Antioxidants"
http://www.eveningsun.com/ci_10157252

 
4. Dr. Jeffrey Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, was quoted Aug. 15 in The Canberra Times about Australia's efforts to adopt strategies developed by UCLA and Los Angeles paramedics to offer more effective treatments for stroke victims.

"Bid to Boost Emergency Stroke Care"

 


August 8, 2008:

1. Greg Cole, associate director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in the Semel Institute, was quoted Aug. 5 by HealthDay News about diets rich in fish, fruits and vegetables that are frequently associated with lower cardiovascular risk.

"Fish May Ward Off Dementia and Stroke"
http://health.usnews.com/articles/health/healthday/2008/08/05/fish-may-ward-off-dementia-and-stroke.html

 
2. Paul Thompson, a professor of neurology at the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was interviewed in the August issue of Allure magazine on the neurological effects of taking stimulant drugs, and how a growing number of people are abusing stimulants to lose weight.

 

 

August 1, 2008:

1. Alzheimer's Research Draws Headlines

Reuters reported July 30 on research by Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Alzheimer Disease Center, on a new drug being tested for Alzheimer's disease. He also commented in a Forbes article about another potential drug and was quoted in a July 28 Los Angeles Times article surveying recent research on Alzheimer's disease.

"Drugs to Reverse Alzheimer’s Disease Prove Elusive"
 
"Medivation Alzheimer's Drug Helps -- if Used Early"
 
"Elan Tanks as Buzz for New Alzheimer's Drug Dies"

 
2. Reuters Health Explores Biomarkers for Early Alzheimer's
A July 25 Reuters Health article reported on research by Dr. John Ringman, assistant director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research at UCLA, showing that levels of specific proteins in the body begin to drop during early Alzheimer's, suggesting their usefulness as biomarkers to identify and track the disease's progression before symptoms appear.

"Biomarkers Identified for Preclinical Familial Alzheimer Disease"
http://www.medicalimagingmag.com/reuters_article.asp?id=20080725clin009.html
 

3. Greg Cole, professor-in-residence of neurology and associate director of the UCLA Alzheimer Disease Research Center, was quoted July 28 in a HealthDay News article about a new study finding unexpectedly higher rates of mild cognitive impairment among elderly Americans. He also commented July 30 in HealthDay on the increased risk for adult children of mothers with Alzheimer's to develop the disorder themselves.

"Rates of Mild Cognitive Impairment Higher than Expected"
http://www.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=617735
 
"Moms with Alzheimer's May Pass on Risk to Kids"
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/07/30/AR2008073002265.html

 


July 25, 2008:

1. Wires Chronicle Alzheimer's Earliest Stages
United Press International reported July 21 on the research of Dr. John Ringman, associate clinical professor of neurology and assistant director of the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research. He showed that levels of specific proteins in the body begin to drop during Alzheimer's earliest stages, making them potentially useful as biomarkers to help identify and track the disease's progression before symptoms appear. A separate article also appeared July 19 on Asian News International.

"Alzheimer's May Become More Predictable"
http://www.kogo.com/cc-common/news/sections/lifestylearticle.html?feed=104777&article=3985611


 
2. Santa Clarita Radio Reports on New Stroke Study
KHTS 1220AM reported July 17 on a UCLA-led stroke study called the Field Administration of Stroke Therapy ? Magnesium (FAST-MAG) Trial. Currently underway in Los Angeles County, the study is testing whether the administration of magnesium sulfate into a vein in the arm is helpful to patients at the first signs of a stroke.

"Stroke Study Meeting Set for Wednesday"
http://www.hometownstation.com/local-news/stroke-newhall-clarita-2008-07-17-16-15-2.html


July 18, 2008:

1. Dr. Alon Avidan, associate professor of neurology, offered advice in a July 11 WebMd article on natural remedies that can help alleviate insomnia and other sleep problems.

"Natural Good Sleep: Tips on Melatonin, Valerian, and More"
http://www.webmd.com/diet/vitamins-supplements-8/natural-good-sleep-tips-on-melatanon-valerian

 
2. Dr. Bruce Dobkin, professor of neurology and director of the neurological rehabilitation and research unit at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, was quoted July 13 in a Philadelphia Inquirer article about patients who seek experimental stem-cell treatments overseas.

"Stem-cell Tourism Troubles Experts"
http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20080713_Stem-cell_tourism_troubles_experts.html

 
3. Dr. Dan Geschwind, the Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Distinguished Professor of Human Genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine, was quoted July 11 in U.S. News & World Report on a new autism study suggesting that genes involved in the disorder may affect the brain's ability to develop in response to experience, a key aspect of learning. He also commented July 10 in a Washington Post article about a study suggesting that certain mental activities can help overcome defects in genes that cause autism.

"Autism and a Link to Brain Development"
http://www.usnews.com/blogs/on-parenting/2008/7/11/autism-and-a-link-to-brain-development.html

"Mental Activity May Affect Autism-Linked Genes"
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/07/10/AR2008071002750.html

 

July 11, 2008:

1. Bruce Dobkin, professor of neurology and director of the neurological rehabilitation and research unit, was quoted July 5 in the Belleville News-Democrat (IL) about patients who seek experimental stem cell treatments in China.

'I Feel a lot Better than I Did' ? Waterloo Man gets Stem Cell Injections in China"
http://www.bnd.com/news/local/story/389079.html

 


June 27, 2008:

1. Dr. Daniel Geschwind, Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Professor of Human Genetics and professor of neurology and psychiatry at the Semel Institute, was quoted in a June 23 New York Sun article on left-handed politicians.

"One Election Outcome Certain: A Lefty Will Win White House"
http://www.nysun.com/national/one-election-outcome-certain-a-lefty-will-win/80480/

 


June 20, 2008:

1. NY Times Explains Progression of Schizophrenia
Paul Thompson, professor of neurology and a member of the Laboratory of Neuro-Imaging, was featured June 13 in a Q&A on the New York Times website. The interview discussed current understanding of the causes of schizophrenia and Thompson's use of imaging technology to map the disease's processes. The piece included time-lapse animations compiled from brain scans taken over many years that show the disease's progression in comparison to a normal developing brain.

"Visualizing Schizophrenia"
http://health.nytimes.com/ref/health/healthguide/esn-schizophrenia-expert.html
 

2. KGIL Radio Talks about Alzheimer's Disease
Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, professor of neurology and director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center, was interviewed June 11 on KGIL 1260-AM's "Michael Jackson Show." Cummings spoke about the risk factors, preventive measures and upcoming drugs for Alzheimer's disease treatment.

"Alzheimer's Disease"
http://www.michaeljacksontalkradio.com/

 
3. Greg Cole, professor of neurology and associate director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center, was quoted June 12 in a HealthDay News article about a class of drugs that shows promise for treating Alzheimer's disease.

"New Class of Drugs May Fight Alzheimer's"
http://health.usnews.com/articles/health/healthday/2008/06/11/new-class-of-drugs-may-fight-alzheimers.html

 


June 13, 2008:

1. Reuters Health Reports on Stroke Study:
Reuters Health reported June 10 on a new UCLA study that found 60 percent of strokes that follow a transient ischemic attack (TIA) in patients with a large narrowed brain artery occurred within 90 days of the index event. Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, associate professor of neurology at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine and director of the Olive View-UCLA stroke program, commented.

"Most Strokes after TIA Occur within 90 Days"
http://www.medicexchange.com/Neuro/news.aspx/14203/Most-strokes-after-TIA-occur-within-90-days

 
2. Greg Cole, professor of neurology and associate director of the UCLA Alzheimer Disease Research Center, was quoted June 6 in a Copley News Service article about research suggesting that factors causing diabetes may also trigger Alzheimer's disease.

"Factors in Diabetes Might Trigger Alzheimer's Disease, Study Says"
http://halife.com/living/health/today's_health_scene0609.html

 
3. Dr. Paul Vespa, director of neurocritical care at UCLA Medical Center, was quoted in a June 1 Managed Executive Healthcare article on the use of intensivists in an ICU setting.

"Intensivists Bring Experience to Critical Care Medicine"

 

June 6, 2008:

1. MedPage Today Notes Brain Cancer Study
MedPage Today on May 30 highlighted a brain cancer research study by Dr. Timothy Cloughesy, clinical professor of neurology and a researcher at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. He is testing the angiogenesis inhibitor Avastin on recurrent glioblastoma.

"Avastin Alone Shows Edge in Recurrent Glioblastoma"
http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ASCOMeeting/tb/9655
 
2. Greg Cole, professor of neurology and associate director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center, was quoted May 30 by HealthDay News about research suggesting that antioxidants in green tea may help prevent the build-up of a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer's disease. The report also appeared in the Washington Post.

"Green Tea Antioxidant May Help Prevent Alzheimer's"
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/30/AR2008053001886.html
 


May 30, 2008:

1. Dr. George Bartzokis, professor of neurology and director of the Memory Disorders and Alzheimer Disease Clinic, was quoted in a May 28 Associated Press story about the use of antidepressants in stroke victims. The report appeared on the websites for Newsweek the San Francisco Chronicle.

"Study Suggests Antidepressants for Stroke Victims"
http://www.newsweek.com/id/138840

 

 
May 23, 2008:

1. Experts Comment on Brain Cancer Therapies and Prognosis
Dr. Timothy Cloughesy, clinical professor of neurology and director of the neuro-oncology program at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, commented May 22 in the Boston Herald, May 21 in the Wall Street Journal and May 20 on KTLA-Channel 5 and KNX 1070AM about malignant brain tumors and the possible prognosis for Sen. Edward Kennedy.

"Targeted Drugs Take a Crack at Brain Cancer"
http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2008/05/21/targeted-drugs-take-a-crack-at-brain-cancer/?mod=WSJBlog

"Brain Cancer"
http://www.ktla.com/health

"Honeymoon Over Soon"
http://news.bostonherald.com/news/regional/general/view.bg?articleid=1095618&format=text

 
2. UPI Asks if Chimps can Develop Alzheimer's
Research by Dr. Daniel Geschwind, professor of neurology and psychiatry; Giovanni Coppola, assistant adjunct professor of neurology; and Jeremy Davis-Turak, senior research associate in neurology, was featured in a May 15 report by United Press International. The study found evidence of the brain plaques and tangles characteristic of Alzheimer's disease in the brain of a deceased chimpanzee.

"Alzheimer's Brain Tangles Found in Chimps"
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Science/2008/05/15/alzheimers_brain_tangles_found_in_chimps/8012/

 

 
May 16, 2008:

1. Gregory Cole, professor of medicine and neurology and associate director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center at UCLA, was quoted May 9 in a HealthDay News article about the use of flavonoids, compounds found in many fruits and vegetables, to thwart Alzheimer's disease.

"Flavonoids May Help Treat Alzheimer's"
http://health.usnews.com/articles/health/healthday/2008/05/09/flavonoids-may-help-treat-alzheimers.html
 

 

May 9, 2008:

1. Arthur Toga, professor of neurology and director of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, was quoted May 4 in a Ventura County Star about the potential use of neuroscientific arguments by the defense in the trial of a teenager accused of shooting a gay classmate at an Oxnard, Calif., junior high school.

"Brain Maturation may be Defense in Teen's Murder Trial"
http://www.venturacountystar.com/news/2008/may/04/brain-maturation-may-be-defense-in-teens-murder/
 

 

April 25, 2008:

1. The research of Gregory Cole, professor of medicine and neurology and associate director of the UCLA Alzheimer Disease Research Center, was featured in a May 1 article in the San Diego Union Tribune about why diabetics are up to 65 percent more likely to develop Alzheimer's.

"Factors in Diabetes might Trigger Alzheimer's Disease, Study says"
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/health/20080501-9999-1n1diab.html
 


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